World’s ‘rarest tree frog’ found!

Picture 289Andrew and the team have found what they were looking for – a female Isthmohyla rivularis alive and well in the Costa Rican cloud forest of Monteverde. They also found some more males of this species giving hope that they are surviving and breeding there. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7609780.stm

This species was thought extinct for 20 years until Andrew found a single male when he was there last year. (See previous post for this story)

FIND OUT ALL ABOUT ISTHMOHYLA RIVULARIS HERE

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Rare frog found!

Picture 344

(c) Andrew Gray, 1997

Andrew and the team of researchers on the Costa Rican expedition have found the rare and critically endangered Red-eyed stream frog Duellmanohyla uranochroa. The BBC following the group have been able to film this species for the very first time! For more on this story see the link below.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7603295.stm

The hunt is on!

Andrew is currently in Costa Rica on fieldwork and leading a team from Chester Zoo and the University of Manchester. They are searching for Isthmohyla rivularis (right), a frog that Andrew rediscovered last year after it had been thought extinct about 20 years.

Whilst there, he and Mark Dickinson from the Photon Science Institute at the University of Manchester will be taking a spectrometer into the field to investigate how different frog species reflect Inra-red light. Something, that up until now they have only had the opportunity to do with captive frogs in the laboratory (http://www.psi.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/news/archive/2007/191107.html)

The team will also visit the last known breeding site of Lithobates vibicarius. The very remote area is where Andrew visited last year and returned with a few specimens to initiate a captive breeding program with Chester Zoo for the species. Tthey are returning to see how the population is fairing and help support a conservation program that Andrew proposed for protecting the species in the wild.

Following the group on this expedition are the BBC. Check out the following links to follow the groups adventures:

Experts poised for rare frog hunt: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7591050.stm

Frog Hunt: In search for the world’s rarest frogs: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7597865.stm

From poisonous hoppers to screaming frogs: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7597701.stm

Check back soon for more updates to the expedition!!

Sunbathing aids frogs in cure for deadly fungus?

Rather than taking frogs from the wild, Andrew and Mark take hi-tech equipment to the rainforests of Costa Rica!

Rather than taking frogs from the wild, Andrew and Mark take hi-tech equipment to the rainforests of Costa Rica!

Follow this link to see Andrew explaining about some of the important Infra-red reflectance research he is doing in collaboration with Mark Dickinson and Richard Preziosi at the University of Manchester : http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7464437.stm

For his other research work using OCT, see also: http://www.octnews.org/entity/profile/andrew-gray/

Rare frog rediscovered!

At the moment we are also rearing some recently metamorphosed froglets of another Costa Rican frog Isthmohyla lancastri. These small tree frogs live around and breed in fast flowing streams in the rainforest. Their call is really cool, like a little chirping bird. The specimens we have call in the back area all day long……

In the future we are hoping we can put these beautiful little frogs on display  and further highlight the important amphibian conservation work being carried out and in September, Andrew will be travelling back to Costa Rica to try and find their rarest relative Isthmohyla rivularis, which he rediscovered at Monteverde last year:

 http://www.wildlifeextra.com/go/news/extinct-frog935.html

Welcome to Frog Blog

Thank you for joining us for our first Frog Blog!

On Wednesday 23rd July both of us met with Richard Gibson and Douglas Sherriff from Chester Zoo regarding the development of a conservation project involving Green-eyed frogs Lithobates vibicaria. Last year, Andrew  acquired some specimens of this Costa Rican species from what is thought to be the last known breeding site in the world for the species. The pond is at Monteverde, and Andrew was given special permission from the authorities to collect a few tadpole specimens to start an Ex-situ breeding programme as one of the ways of helping conserve this critically endangered species. Andrew has proposed a conservation project that mainly involves supporting the wild frogs in Costa Rica. All the specimens Andrew collected are now going to Chester Zoo, who have welcomed the opportunity to  support the conservation of this criticaly endangered species.